Rammasun (was 09W - Northwestern Pacific Ocean)
 

 

Imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite captured a wide-eyed Typhoon Rammasun as it was making landfall in northern Hainan Island, China early on July 18. A rainfall analysis using another NASA satellite showed the flooding potential of the storm as it left the Philippines and headed for China. Now, Rammasun is headed for a final landfall near the northeastern border of Vietnam and China.

On July 17, an analysis of Typhoon Rammasun's rainfall was conducted at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The rainfall analysis covered the storm's rainfall from July 10 to 17. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM-calibrated merged global Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) indicated that rainfall totals of over 325 mm (about 12.8 inches) occurred in many parts of the central Philippines as Rammasun swept through.

Typhoon Rammasun passed to the south of the Philippine Capitol of Manila. Rainfall totals there were estimated to be greater than 200 mm (about 7.9 inches). Most of the Philippines were affected by Rammasun but northern Luzon and Mindanao received lower amounts of rainfall than locations closer to the typhoon's track. The highest rainfall totals of over 545 mm (about 21.5 inches) were found in the South China Sea southwest of Manila.

On July 18 at 05:35 UTC (1:35 a.m. EDT) NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Typhoon Rammasun just as the eye of the storm was approaching Hainan Island, China. The MODIS instrument aboard Aqua captured an image of the storm that showed a clear eye, surrounded by bands of thunderstorms that extended into southern China's mainland, west into the Gulf of Tonkin, blanketing Hainan Island, and over the South China Sea.

On July 18 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT) Rammasun had moved back over water in the Gulf of Tonkin and had strengthened back into a super typhoon. The Gulf of Tonkin is the body of water associated with the South China Sea that lies between Hainan Island, China and Vietnam.

At that time, Rammasun's maximum sustained winds had increased back to 135 knots (155 mph/250 kph) making it a Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson sc. Rammasun was centered near 20.2 north and 110.8 east, about 217 nautical miles (249.7 miles/401.9 km) southwest of Hong Kong. It was moving to the northwest at 12 knots (13.8 mph/22.2 kph) and generating very high waves in the Gulf. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) estimates 35-foot (10.6 meter) high seas. Hong Kong was still under Strong Wind Signal #3.

JTWC forecasters noted that animated multispectral and enhanced Infrared satellite imagery showed Rammasun's eye had become more organized, and cloud top temperatures cooled. Cooler cloud top temperatures indicate more uplift in a storm, pushing the clouds higher into the troposphere. 

Warnings are in effect for northeastern Vietnam, and can be found at the Vietnam Meteorological website:http://www.nchmf.gov.vn/Web/vi-VN/104/23/22207/D

NASA's TRMM Satellite Adds Up Typhoon Rammasun's Philippines Deluge

Typhoon Rammasun dropped large amounts of rainfall over the Philippines, and the TRMM satellite was used to measure it from space. Rammasun is now making its way toward Hainan Island, China.

NASA and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency partner on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite. As TRMM orbits the Earth it has the ability to calculate rainfall occurring in storms and a rainfall analysis using TRMM and other data helps scientists calculate total rainfall.

A preliminary analysis of rainfall during the period when typhoon Rammasun was moving over the Philippines. The analysis is the result of a TRMM-calibrated merged global Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) performed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland These TMPA rainfall total estimates were for the period from July 9-16, 2014. The analysis indicated that rainfall totals of over 325 mm (about 12.8 inches) were located over many parts of the Philippines. The analysis also showed that northern Luzon had received lower amounts of rainfall than the central Philippines.

Typhoon Rammasun known locally as "Glenda" is the most powerful typhoon to hit the Philippines this year. As of today, At least ten deaths have been attributed to Rammasun. Typhoon Rammasun's track was north of Super Typhoon Haiyan's path of destruction through the Philippines in November 2013.

 

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Rammasun on July 16 and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument aboard captured infrared data that showed powerful thunderstorms continued to circle the storm's center. Cloud top temperatures around the center of circulation were colder than -63 F/-52C indicating cloud tops were near the top of the troposphere and there was strong uplift in the storm. Cloud top temperatures that high indicate strong storms with the potential for heavy rainfall, according to previous NASA studies.

On July 17 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT) Rammasun's maximum sustained winds 

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The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Rammasun's final landfall just north of the China/Vietnam border around July 19 at 0000 UTC.

On July 18 at 05:35 UTC (1:35 a.m. EDT) NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Typhoon Rammasun approaching Hainan Island, China.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TRMM data showed that rainfall totals of over 325 mm (about 12.8 inches) were located over many parts of the Philippines.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On July 17 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT) Rammasun's maximum sustained winds were near 75 knots (86.3 mph/138.9 kph). It was located near 17.2 north latitude and 114.5 east longitude, about 333 nautical miles (383.2 miles/ 616.7 km) south of Hong Kong, China.  The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) expects the storm to strengthen slightly over the next day.  The China Meteorological Agency (CMA) issued an orange warning for Hainan Island and the mainland. CMA forecasters expect that Rammasun will approach the coastal area of eastern Hainan to western Guangxi and will make landfall on Lingshui of Hainan Island at 0600 UTC (2 a.m. EDT) on the morning of July 18 before heading toward Vietnam.  The JTWC expects a second and final landfall near the northeastern border of Vietnam and China on July 19.
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Rammasun on July 16 and the AIRS instrument aboard captured infrared data that showed powerful thunderstorms (purple) continued to circle the storm's center.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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On July 16, 2014 at 02:40 Typhoon Rammasun had already crossed the Philippines and entered the South China Sea as NASA's TRMM satellite passed overhead and captured this image.
July 16, 2014 - NASA Sees Typhoon Rammasun Exit the Philippines

Typhoon Rammasun passed through the central Philippines overnight and NASA satellite imagery showed that the storm's center moved into the South China Sea. NASA's TRMM satellite showed the soaking rains that Rammasun brought to the Philippines as it tracked from east to west.

Before Rammasun made landfall, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite passed over the storm and measured cloud heights and rainfall rates. On July 14, 2014 at 18:19 UTC (2:19 p.m. EDT), TRMM spotted powerful, high thunderstorms reaching heights of almost 17km (10.5 miles). Rain was measured falling at a rate of almost 102 mm (about 4 inches) per hour and that heavy rainfall continued as Rammasun made landfall in the central Philippines.

Rammasun made landfall near Legazpi City on July 15. Legazpi is the capital city of the province of Albay in the Philippines, located on the east coast.

On July 16, 2014 at 02:40 UTC (July 15 at 10:40 p.m. EDT) Typhoon Rammasun had already crossed the Philippines and entered the South China Sea when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument provides high-resolution imagery and captured Rammasun after it moved west of Manila. The eye of the typhoon had become obscured by clouds and was not apparent in the MODIS image. The typhoon also appeared somewhat elongated in a west-to-east direction.

On July 16 at 09:00 UTC (5 a.m. EDT), Typhoon Rammasun's maximum sustained winds were near 80 knots (92.0 mph/148.2 kph). The center was in the South China Sea, near 15.4 north latitude and 118.5 east longitude. It was about 114 nautical miles west-northwest of Manila and was moving to the northwest at 15 knots (17.2 mph/27.7 kph). The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Rammasun to strengthen to 105 knots (120.8 mph/194.5 kph) by July 18 before weakening again.

Typhoon Rammasun is expected to pass north of Hainan Island, China on July 18 around 0600 UTC (2 a.m. EDT). As a result, China Meteorological Administration (CMA) noted that Typhoon standby signal No 1 is expected to be raised today, July 16 as Typhoon Rammasun is expected to pass within about 500 miles (~ 800 kilometers) from Hong Kong. For current watches and warnings from CMA, visit:http://www.cma.gov.cn/en/WeatherWarnings/ActiveWarnings/201407/t20140716_252541.html.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NASA's TRMM satellite flew over on July 14, 2014 at 1819 UTC and data was used to make this 3-D flyby showing thunderstorms to heights of almost 17km (10.5 miles). Rain was measured falling at a rate of almost 102 mm (about 4 inches).